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Conflict in the Koreas

All eyes on the Korean peninsula. We look at the latest.

South Korean marines salute their fellow troops killed in a North Korean bombardment, during a memorial service in South Korea, Nov. 24, 2010. (AP)

Now comes the stare-down on the Korean peninsula. North Korean shells rained down last week on a South Korean island.  They brought the first South Korean civilian deaths from North Korean fire since the armistice that ended the Korean War in 1953. 

South Korea is a longtime US ally. No small number of Americans spent Thanksgiving wondering if we were teetering on war. Now China’s in the middle of things. U.S. warships are maneuvering off the Korean shore. 

This flare-up is not over. What next? We look at war, peace, and in-between, on the Korean peninsula.

-Tom Ashbrook

Guests:

David Sanger, chief Washington correspondent for the New York Times. He’s author of “The Inheritance: The World Obama Confronts and the Challenges to American Power.”

Evan Ramstad, Korea correspondent for the Wall Street Journal.

Jennifer Lind, assistant professor of government at Dartmouth College and author of “Sorry States: Apologies in International Politics.”

Mitchell Reiss, president of Washington College. He held several top diplomatic positions in the administration of President George W. Bush and has extensive experience negotiating with North Korea, including as chief negotiator for the United States in the Korean Peninsula Energy Development Organization in the administration of President Clinton.

Brian Myers, associate professor of international studies at Dongseo University in Busan, South Korea, and author of “The Cleanest Race: How North Koreans See Themselves and Why it Matters.”

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