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Body Scans & Airport Backlash

Full-body scanners and deep pat-downs have Americans pushing back over the indignities of airport security.

An airline passenger undergoes a full body scan at O'Hare International Airport, Nov. 17, 2010 in Chicago. (AP)

We stood in line. We took off our belts and shoes. We threw out our water bottles, and put shampoo in little plastic bags. But the latest security measures at American airports are pushing some passengers over the edge: the full body scan; the deep body pat down.

Eighty percent of those polled say they have no problem if it’s for flight safety. But twenty percent do, and they’re making a lot of noise and threatening to snarl air travel this week, the busiest travel week of the year.

Everybody’s asking if there isn’t a better way. We examine the uproar over American airport security.

-Tom Ashbrook

Guests:

Benet Wilson, online managing editor for business aviation for Aviation Week.

Chris Calabrese, legislative counsel for the American Civil Liberties Union.

Douglas Laird, former director of security for Northwest Airlines and current president of Laird & Associates, an aviation security consulting firm.

Peter Wood, former professor of anthropology at Boston University and author of “A Bee in the Mouth: Anger in America.” He’s president of the National Association of Scholars.

Here’s the much-discussed “don’t touch my junk” incident:

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