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The Buzz Over Beekeeping

Beekeeping in America. With bees under pressure, many Americans are tending hives. We listen to the hum, and taste the honey.

Timothy Fulton, a self-described "backyard beekeeper" is seen with his bees in Kenosha, Wis. (AP)

American bees are disappearing, but not in a lot of American backyards. 

As bees have generally come under pressure all over, a new wave of individual Americans have stepped up to start and tend their own hives. 

Backyard beekeeping is hot and cool at the same time — part environmental, part epicurean. A meditation on buzzing beauty. A path to nature, and to sweet pots of honey. 

Maybe there’s a hive in your back lot, or a honeycomb fresh on your kitchen table.  

This Hour, On Point: we’re catching up with America’s new wave of backyard beekeepers.

Guests:

Kim Flottum joins us from Kent, OH. He is editor of Bee Culture Magazine.

Jane Wild joins us in the studio. She is a ‘backyard beekeeper’ based in West Newbury, MA. She is also vice president of the Essex County Beekeepers’ Association. She has been keeping bees since 1991. She and her husband have 14 hives.

David Tarpy joins us from Durham, NC. He is one of the country’s top bee researchers –known more formally as an apiculturist and entomologist. He teaches and raises queen bees as part of his research at North Carolina State University. He is the official state judge of honey and hive products (honey, wax, mead) at the North Carolina state fair.

Many thanks to the Savannah Bee Company for providing us with samples of their artisanal honeys.

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ONPOINT
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Aug 28, 2015
WDBJ-TV7 meteorologist Leo Hirsbrunner, right, wipes his eyes during the early morning newscast as anchors Kimberly McBroom, center, and guest anchor Steve Grant deliver the news at the station in Roanoke, Va., Thursday, Aug. 27, 2015. Reporter Alison Parker and cameraman Adam Ward were killed during a live broadcast Wednesday, while on assignment in Moneta. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

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Aug 28, 2015
Lightning first ignited the Meadow fire on July 20, 2014 in Yosemite. By September 8, the fire had charred 2,582 acres. Bernie Krause has recorded soundscapes of national parks destroyed by large areas of forest fires. Listen below.  (National Park Service)

A legendary natural sound collector shares his recordings. We’ll listen in.

 
Aug 28, 2015
WDBJ-TV7 meteorologist Leo Hirsbrunner, right, wipes his eyes during the early morning newscast as anchors Kimberly McBroom, center, and guest anchor Steve Grant deliver the news at the station in Roanoke, Va., Thursday, Aug. 27, 2015. Reporter Alison Parker and cameraman Adam Ward were killed during a live broadcast Wednesday, while on assignment in Moneta. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

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