PLEDGE NOW
The End of "Lost"

We say goodbye to “Lost,” the TV series that began with a plane crash and became a phenomenon. Plus, the “24” finale.

The cast of LOST (abc.com)

The cast of LOST (abc.com)

After six years of mystery on a tropical island, ABC’s long-running series “Lost” ended last night, with a two-and-a-half hour finale, in five and a half hours of hoopla.

“Lost” was a landmark television drama – a kind of “Twilight Zone” shot in Hawaii and so loaded with plots, sub-plots and cosmic themes that viewers were eventually either in or out.  “Losties,” or just lost.

But the loyal were incredibly loyal, bent on a search for the meaning of life – or at least the smoke monster.

This Hour, On Point: we’ll look at the end of “Lost” – and what that all meant.

Guests:

Jeff Jensen, a.k.a. “Doc Jensen” to “Lost” fans, is senior writer at Entertainment Weekly. His video blog is “Totally Lost.”

Lynnette Porter, professor of humanities and social sciences at the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. She’s co-author, with David Lavery, of “Lost’s Buried Treasures” and “Unlocking the Meaning of Lost”.

Aaron Barnhart, TV critic for the Kansas City Star. His blog is “TV Barn.” Read his piece on what it means for three “defining dramas” —  “Lost,” “24,” and “Law & Order” — to bow out together. He’s the author of “Tasteland.”

More:

Former On Point intern Suzanne Merkelson blogs about Lost for The Atlantic. Check it out!

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