90.9 WBUR - Boston's NPR news station
Top Stories:
PLEDGE NOW
Energy Sec. Steven Chu: More Drilling Proposal "Not a Mistake"

U.S. Energy Sec. Steven Chu (Credit: AP)

U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu said Wednesday it was not a mistake for the administration to support more offshore drilling as part of comprehensive energy reform, despite the oil rig spill in the Gulf of Mexico that continues to threaten coastal areas.

Chu told host Tom Ashbrook that the administration is “pausing” to take stock of what happened, but new drilling remains on the table. “I don’t think it’s a mistake,” Chu said. “I think the president has always said that we need a balanced portfolio of measures in order to do several things, in a complete energy package.”

The Obama administration has been under increasing pressure to change its position because of the Gulf accident. Chu said he could not guarantee that such incidents would not happen again.

[T]his is indeed an unfortunate accident. We’re trying to find out what happened. But the other thing to bear in mind is that the multinationals of the world, the Exxon-Mobils, the BPs, the Chevrons, the Shells, most of their oil reserves are beginning to transition to offshore reserves, and that’s just the fact. So, accidents do happen. I don’t think anyone really says this never can happen, but we have to take stock of what happened, understand what happened, and aggressively put in much better safeguards to lower that probability substantially.

Below are excerpts from the transcript of the interview. You can listen to the whole discussion.

TOM ASHBROOK: Your thoughts as we all watch the oil spread across the Gulf?

SEC. CHU: Well it’s indeed an unfortunate accident and the first order of business is to contain that oil spill and to minimize its damage to the coastline. So that’s what we’re focused on. 

TOM ASHBROOK: Was it a mistake for the Obama administration, you’re part of it, to just, what, a month ago, say let’s look for more opportunities to drill offshore?

SEC. CHU: No, I don’t think it’s a mistake. I think the president has always said that we need a balanced portfolio of measures in order to do several things, in a complete energy package. The first and foremost is we want to decrease our dependence on foreign oil. We want to increase our renewables. We need to transition to renewable to supplies of energy, especially to bring up our energy efficiency – for a lot of goals. These goals range from, fundamentally, this is going to be a big boost to our economy. The world will transition to clean energy and we have an opportunity to lead in that transition.

TOM ASHBROOK: I know that’s your big theme, but I think Americans are looking right now at what’s happening in the Gulf of Mexico. Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor of California, backing off offshore drilling, which he has not so long ago supported. You’ve said we’re not going to do this in a way that threatens the environment or the coast line. But that’s what the President said when he gave the green light for more investigation of offshore drilling a month ago. He said new technologies don’t fail on oil rigs. That is manifestly untrue. So, yes, we know the easy line was to be part of the package, but is the cost too high?

SEC. CHU: Well, as I said this is indeed an unfortunate accident. We’re trying to find out what happened. But the other thing to bear in mind is that the multinationals of the world, the Exxon-Mobils, the BPs, The Chevrons, The Shells, most of their oil reserves are beginning to transition to offshore reserves, and that’s just the fact. So, accidents do happen. I don’t think anyone really says this never can happen, but we have to take stock of what happened, understand what happened, and aggressively put in much better safeguards to lower that probability substantially.

TOM ASHBROOK: You’re a scientist, you know the safeguards that have already been put into effect. Do you really think that it can be done? Do you really thin we can make this safe enough? In this case, we don’t know yet, but the cost may be the economy and the ecology of the Gulf of Mexico, for heaven sakes?

SEC. CHU: Well, whenever things happen, whenever an accident happens, where something happens — we see this in all cases, when there’re major earthquakes, we learn a little bit more when there are accidents. We learn a lot more. And so right now there were, as I understand it, this so-called “BOP,” the blowout prevention valve, had several safeguard redundant features and apparently they all failed. And so as we work very hard to figure out what happened – first, you stop the leak and then do some more … You find out what really happened, and so you will have to do some forensic work. And then you go forward. You know, airplanes crash. We find out what happened, and we go forward and every time these truly unfortunate accidents happen, you learn from them.

TOM ASHBROOK: “Accidents happen” may sound to some ears a little cavalier here. I know your record, and I know where you are on global warming. I know you don’t mean it lightly, but given the extent of the damage, it may sound like … When you were director of the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, you led a lot of research into renewable energy. A whole lot of that was financed, as I understand it, by BP. A $500 million dollar grant from BP to establish an Energy Bio Sciences Institute there. Does that influence your view of this particular company, and this particular accident?

SEC. CHU: No, it doesn’t. When I say — I hope I didn’t sound cavalier when I said, I believe I said – this truly unfortunate accident happened and that we have to learn from it. It’s something that we want to press towards zero accidents. This is something that  industry does all the time, things have gotten better. Clearly, because it happened I would agree things are not perfect, things are not fail-safe, and we have to learn from this. And so we’re pausing, we’re taking a step, and we have to figure out what really happened …

Listen to the full discussion as Secretary Chu and Tom discuss America’s energy future.

Shirin Jaafari contributed to this report.

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
  • TR

    Over the weekend the largest leak was SUCCESSFULLY capped.
    However, this did not align with BP’s agenda, which is their ability to keep taking oil out of the well. So they subsequently TOOK IT OFF.
    Their priority is clearly their own profit. And meanwhile the gusher spews unabated.
    In my mind this is appalling, mind-boggling negligence.
    Hearings are starting this morning. I hope someone on the hill at least has the intelligence, acumen and courage to rigorously challenge their motivations regarding that incident.

  • TR

    Make that criminal negligence.

  • TR

    Maybe Mr Chu would care to comment on this very simple fact that I stated above.

  • Delice Calcote

    What would Chavez do? If the company can’t control “blowouts” “spills” and do the required clean-up….then nationalize them! And natinalize the Federal Reserve while you’re at it! How many accidents? Or is that just the status quo of oil industry? Because in Alaska the oil industry spills consistently and regularly and yet they still operate in Alaska and pollute and SOMETIMES get fined! And the federal oversight? of this industry is consistently lenient also. Both state and federal spill data speaks for itself. My heart, prayers and thoughts go out to the peoples and their businesses that they’ve built. They life is changing before our eyes. Thanks for the great news coverage. I just love the internet and looking at the local news as well as the national coverages. Keep up the great reporting. It takes us all looking and monitoring ….its all our duties. We’re only here for a short time and supposed to be guarding and protecting resources for the future. Just what kind of future the peoples and their businesses see is very uncertain.

ONPOINT
TODAY
Sep 2, 2014
U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., talks with Mark Wilson, event political speaker chairperson, with his wife Elain Chao, former U.S. Secretary of Labor, at the annual Fancy Farm Picnic in Fancy Farm, Ky., Saturday, August 4, 2012. (AP)

Nine weeks counting now to the midterm elections. We’ll look at the key races and the stakes.

Sep 2, 2014
Confederate spymaster Rose O'Neal Greenhow, pictured with her daughter "Little" Rose in Washington, D.C.'s Old Capitol Prison in 1862. (Wikimedia / Creative Commons)

True stories of daring women during the Civil War. Best-selling author Karen Abbott shares their exploits in a new book: “Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy.”

RECENT
SHOWS
Sep 1, 2014
Pittsburgh Steelers outside linebacker Jarvis Jones (95) recovers a fumble by Carolina Panthers quarterback Derek Anderson (3) in the second quarter of the NFL preseason football game on Thursday, Aug. 28, 2014 in Pittsburgh. (AP)

One outspoken fan’s reluctant manifesto against football, and the big push to reform the game.

 
Sep 1, 2014
This Friday, Aug. 22, 2014 photo shows a mural in in the Pullman neighborhood of Chicago dedicated to the history of the Pullman railcar company and the significance for its place in revolutionizing the railroad industry and its contributions to the African-American labor movement. (AP)

On Labor Day, we’ll check in on the American labor force, with labor activist Van Jones, and more.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
Our Week In The Web: August 29, 2014
Friday, Aug 29, 2014

On hypothetical questions, Beyoncé and the unending flow of social media.

More »
Comment
 
Drew Bledsoe Is Scoring Touchdowns (In The Vineyards)
Thursday, Aug 28, 2014

Football great — and vineyard owner — Drew Bledsoe talks wine, onions and the weird way they intersect sometimes in Walla Walla, Washington.

More »
Comment
 
Poutine Whoppers? Why Burger King Is Bailing Out For Canada
Tuesday, Aug 26, 2014

Why is Burger King buying a Canadian coffee and doughnut chain? (We’ll give you a hint: tax rates).

More »
1 Comment