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'Millennials' on America's Future

College students and supporters demonstrate against cuts to higher education at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., Thursday, March 4, 2010. (AP)

Lots of new survey data out on young Americans, age 18-29, the so-called “millennial” generation. They have way more tattoos. We knew that. They have way less certainty they can pay their next tuition bill.

Millennials voted two-to-one for Barack Obama in 2008. Now they’re taking stock, in their own way, of everything. Big goals? Traditional: to be good parents, in a good marriage. Social views? Very open: on sexuality, race, religion. Politics? In flux.

This hour, On Point: we sit down with young Americans for their views on what can and should come next for this country.

Guests:

John Della Volpe, director of polling at Harvard University’s Institute of Politics. He directed a recent survey of “millennials,” Americans aged 18 to 29, on their political views and prospects for the future. He is founder and CEO of SocialSphere, a strategy and technology company focused on millennials.

Joshua Sargent, 22, senior at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. Originally from Portland, Oregon, he is studying international relations.

Marcela Garcia-Castanon, 25, a graduate student at the University of Washington doing research on young people and politics. She is originally from Arizona, the child of migrant workers.

Charles Mitchell, 27, works at a non-profit in Washington that is focused on education. He identifies as a conservative. We first met Charles in 2003 when he was a junior at Bucknell University in Pennsylvania and was president of the Conservative Club.

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