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Google vs. China
A Chinese flag flutters beside Google's headquarters in Beijing on Thursday, Jan. 14, 2010. (AP)

A Chinese flag flutters beside Google's headquarters in Beijing on Thursday, Jan. 14, 2010. (AP)

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Google is huge. China is huge. And now they’re nose-to-nose in a very public standoff.

Google says China has hacked into its systems and the accounts of human-rights activists, and it’s not going to take it anymore. It’s going to stop censoring its search results for China, it says, and maybe pull out of the country.

China says its Internet is open — and that in any case Google, and anybody else who wants to do business in China, have to follow Chinese law.

It’s a business standoff. A standoff over principle. A standoff of giants.

This hour, On Point: Google versus China.

Guests:

James Fallows, national correspondent for The Atlantic. He was based in China from 2006 to 2009. His writings from China are collected in the book “Postcards from Tomorrow Square.”

Kara Swisher, technology columnist for The Wall Street Journal and co-executive editor of All Things Digital, a website owned by Dow Jones covering technology, the Internet and media.

David Barboza, correspondent for The New York Times.  He’s been based in Shanghai since November 2004. He writes about business and culture in China.

Yong Xue, professor of Asian History at Suffolk University.  He maintains a blog in China that has received over 22 million hits, and his columns appear in the Shanghai Morning Post (Xinwen Chen Bao) and China Newsweek (Zhongguo Xinwen Zhoukan).

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Lightning first ignited the Meadow fire on July 20, 2014 in Yosemite. By September 8, the fire had charred 2,582 acres. Bernie Krause has recorded soundscapes of national parks destroyed by large areas of forest fires. Listen below.  (National Park Service)

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WDBJ-TV7 meteorologist Leo Hirsbrunner, right, wipes his eyes during the early morning newscast as anchors Kimberly McBroom, center, and guest anchor Steve Grant deliver the news at the station in Roanoke, Va., Thursday, Aug. 27, 2015. Reporter Alison Parker and cameraman Adam Ward were killed during a live broadcast Wednesday, while on assignment in Moneta. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

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