90.9 WBUR - Boston's NPR news station
Top Stories:
PLEDGE NOW
China, a Year Later
Shanghai, China. (AP)

A view of Shanghai, China, March 2009. (AP)

China just gets bigger as a global issue, a global power. One year ago this month, we packed up On Point and went on the road to China, broadcasting live for a week from the heart of Shanghai.

Today, we’ll turn our microphones back to China, to look at the big changes of the last year: an earthquake in Sichuan, an epic Olympics in Beijing, and economic meltdown all over.

China’s been hit by the meltdown, too. But it’s also emerged, more clearly than ever, as the cash-rich banker to America — with all that means.

This hour, On Point: One year on, we look back to China.

You can join the conversation. After earthquake and Olympics and economic meltdown, how do you see China now? Still on the rise? On a sidetrack? Treasury to the world? Partner? Or something else?

Guests:

Anthony Kuhn, Beijing correspondent for National Public Radio.

Joining us from Beijing is Sun Zhe, professor at the Institute for International Studies and director of the Center for U.S.-China relations at Tsinghua University in Beijing. A wise voice last year with us in Shanghai, he is one of China’s leading scholars in the field of U.S.-China relations and American Studies.

And with us from Shanghai is Fang Xinghai, Director General in the Office for Financial Services in the Shanghai Metropolitan Government and former Deputy CEO of the Shanghai Stock Exchange. A U.S.-educated mover and shaker in the Chinese Communist Party, he also joined us last year in Shanghai.

“On Point in Shanghai”
See the special site we created for our week of broadcasts from Shanghai, April 14-18, 2008. You’ll find all ten shows, along with links, slideshows, videos, music, and listener comments. Plus, host Tom Ashbrook’s daily posts.

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
ONPOINT
TODAY
Mar 26, 2015
In this file photo, protesters sit at the intersection of Wall St. and Broad St. in New York, Monday, Sept. 22, 2014. The protesters, many who were affiliated with Occupy Wall Street, were trying to draw attention to the connection between capitalism and environmental destruction. (AP)

In our age of hyper-inequality, historian Steve Fraser asks when the little guy stands up and says “enough.” He’s with us.

Mar 26, 2015
A child walks through a forest landscape. (Rudolf Vlček / Flickr)

American kids today spend only four to seven minutes a day playing outdoors. We hear a new call to raise the “wild child.”

RECENT
SHOWS
Mar 25, 2015
This June 11, 2014 file photo shows Facebook's "like" symbol at the entrance to the company's campus in Menlo Park, Calif. Facebook users in the U.S. will soon be able to send their friends money using the social network’s Messenger app, the company announced Tuesday, March 17, 2015. (AP)

“Tap and pay”: mobile money, peer-to-peer, all over now. SnapChat, Venmo, now Facebook Messenger. We’ll look at security and the new anthropology of digital money.

 
Mar 25, 2015
In this file photo, Chinese President Xi Jinping, center, shows the way to the guests who attended the signing ceremony of the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing Friday, Oct. 24, 2014. (AP)

Is America now its own worst enemy? Blowing a future that should be good? Harvard’s Joseph Nye and the New Yorker’s John Cassidy join us.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
Mobile Payments Offer Convenience If You Keep Your Email Safe
Thursday, Mar 26, 2015

Thinking about moving your wallet to your phone? You can! And maybe you should? But TechCrunch senior writer Josh Constine has a few things to tell you before you do.

More »
Comment
 
Using Technology To Get Your Kids Outside
Thursday, Mar 26, 2015

The latest and greatest — using apps to make natural exploration more fun for your kids.

More »
Comment
 
Week In The Web: March 20, 2015
Friday, Mar 20, 2015

The emailed comments question continues to haunt us, we shake off / salute our haters and CNN Politics spends way too much time on FinalCut (in a good way!).

More »
Comment