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Education Secretary Arne Duncan
Arne Duncan is seen during a news conference in Chicago, Nov. 13, 2008. (AP)

Secretary of Education Arne Duncan in Chicago, where he was chief of public schools, on Nov. 13, 2008. (AP)

The U.S. secretary of education always has a big bully pulpit. President Barack Obama’s brand new secretary of education, Chicago’s Arne Duncan, has a big bully pulpit plus a huge pile of stimulus money — one hundred billion dollars — to shake up American education.

That’s historic. Today we’ll talk with the Secretary Duncan about his plans for America’s schools. About testing and charter schools, teachers unions and No Child Left Behind. About how he hopes to make American education competitive again.

This hour, On Point: U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan.

You can join the conversation. What’s your question for Secretary Duncan, America’s education man of the hour?

Guest:

Arne Duncan joins us from Washington. He was confirmed as Secretary of Education on Jan. 20, 2009. Prior to his appointment, he served for seven years as the chief executive of the Chicago Public Schools.

More links:

The New York Times has a good summary of the historic moment in which Secretary Duncan arrives. For a tough critique of President Obama and Secretary Duncan, see the Schools Matter blog. And The Wall Street Journal has an interesting piece on the D.C. voucher controversy and how it frames big choices for the new administration.

Jay Mathews, education columnist for The Washington Post, offers an up-close account of school reform in his new book, “Work hard. Be Nice: How Two Inspired Teachers Created the Most Promising Schools in America.” He joined us last year for our ’08 campaign hour on the education issue.

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