90.9 WBUR - Boston's NPR news station
Top Stories:
PLEDGE NOW
Sharon Eubanks vs. the Bush Administration
photo

It’s tough out there for US Attorney General Alberto Gonzalez. Yesterday in Chicago he ran from a press conference after three minutes as questions rained down on the political corruption of the Justice Department.

Former top attorney Sharon Eubanks threw another big rock in the pond last week. She led the department’s giant case against big tobacco, and sought $130 billion dollars in penalties.

At the last minute, White House appointees chopped that to $10 billion. This insider now charges politics and a betrayal of the American public.

This hour On Point: justice, politics, huge money and Sharon Eubanks.

Quotes from the Show:

“What was very interesting about this case was just at the close of trial, the government indicated that instead of 130 billion dollars, they would seek only 10 billion dollars [in smoking cessation remedies].” Jason McLure

“The reason that it’s so important right now for everyone to understand that these were politically motivated changes to what the government is seeking [in damages] is because the case continues to this day on appeal and the same individuals are in charge. When it came to light — the issue surrounding the firing of eight US attorneys — I began to think more deeply about what had happened in our case” Sharon Eubanks

“They tried to get the trial team, me and the attorneys working with me, to come up with a lower dollar amount. But by that time, we already had put in the evidence of the propriety of 130-billion-dollar remedy on smoking cessation. All of that evidence was in. One thing that I was told to do before we rested was to try to get in some other evidence that would weaken the strength of the evidence we had already put in.” Sharon Eubanks

“Every lawsuit filed by the United States, at least in the civil division, has to be approved by a political appointee — that’s just the nature of how business is conducted.” Sharon Eubanks

“I had voiced objections to the [dollar amount] proposal early on not based on a policy point of view, but based on legal considerations.” Frank Marine

“There should not be this much interference going on in our executive branch.” Listener from Atlanta

“The problem is that we persist in calling this the politicization of the Justice Department. This was criminal behavior and obstruction of justice.” Listener from Iowa

“It’s very typical of internal Justice Department investigations – they don’t ask questions they don’t want to hear answers to.” Jonathan Turley

Guests:

Jason McLure, Justice Department Reporter for Legal Times

Sharon Eubanks, former lead lawyer in U.S. vs. Phillip Morris et al., the federal government’s landmark racketeering lawsuit against the tobacco industry

Frank Marine, former member of the government’s legal team in U.S. vs. Phillip Morris et al.

Jonathan Turley, Professor of Law at George Washington University.

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
ONPOINT
TODAY
Apr 1, 2015
In this Dec. 19, 2014 file photo, oil pump jacks work in unison, in Williston, N.D. The number of drill rigs in western North Dakota's oil patch has slipped to a five-year low with the falling price of oil.  (AP)

American energy production at a time of low oil prices. Oil, gas, wind, solar. And what the changed oil price landscape means.

Apr 1, 2015
Characters and logo from BabyFirstTV , a television and digital entertainment group specifically targeting infants and babies younger than two years old. (BabyFirstTV / Facebook)

A new network aimed exclusively at infants and toddlers. We weigh the impact.

RECENT
SHOWS
Mar 31, 2015
Jazz icon Billie Holiday performs in New York City's Club Downbeat in February 1947.  (Library of Congress / Creative Commons)

A meditation on the life and music of Billie Holiday. The lady who sang the blues.

 
Mar 31, 2015
Some of the hundreds of people who gathered outside the Indiana Statehouse on Saturday, March 28, 2015, for a rally against legislation signed Thursday by Gov. Mike Pence stand on the Statehouse's south steps during the 2-hour-long rally. (AP)

Indiana’s controversial Religious Freedom Restoration Act. Critics call it anti-gay. Business leaders say bad for the economy. The governor’s not backing down. We’ll dive in.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
Our Week In The Web: March 27, 2015
Friday, Mar 27, 2015

More on the incessant email debate, plus some goats living their best lives and the sad allure of Manhattan’s shuttered Pommes Frites.

More »
2 Comments
 
Mobile Payments Offer Convenience If You Keep Your Email Safe
Thursday, Mar 26, 2015

Thinking about moving your wallet to your phone? You can! And maybe you should? But TechCrunch senior writer Josh Constine has a few things to tell you before you do.

More »
1 Comment
 
Using Technology To Get Your Kids Outside
Thursday, Mar 26, 2015

The latest and greatest — using apps to make natural exploration more fun for your kids.

More »
Comment