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All The Shah's Men
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Fifty years ago today, in a bold and far-reaching covert operation, the CIA overthrew the elected government of Iran. Although the coup seemed successful at first, its “haunting and terrible legacy” is now becoming clear.

Operation Ajax, as the plot was code-named, reshaped the history of Iran, the Middle East and the world. It restored Mohammad Reza Shah to the Peacock Throne, allowing him to impose a tyranny that ultimately sparked the Islamic Revolution of 1979.

The Islamic Revolution, in turn, inspired fundamentalists throughout the Muslim world, including the Taliban and terrorists who thrived under its protection.

In his new book “All The Shah’s Men,” New York Times correspondent Stephen Kinzer asserts “It is not far-fetched to draw a line from Operation Ajax through the Shah’s repressive regime and the Islamic Revolution to the fireballs that engulfed the World Trade Center in New York.”

Guests:

Stephen Kinzer, New York Times correspondent, who has reported from more than fifty countries on four continents. Author of the new book “All The Shah’s Men: An American Coup and the Roots of Middle East Terror”

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  • sabahdabby

    I lived in Iran between 1953 and 1964. I was there
    during the coup that restored the Shah. I disagree that the Shah ran a tyrannical
    regime.

    As a matter of fact, as a member of the Jewish
    community, we felt safe in Iran. I graduated from the Community School (a
    Presbyterian Missionary School) in Tehran (closed when Khomeini came to power). Unemployment
    and inflation were both low.  The standard
    of living was improving. The country was not at war.  All of these facts point it a country with a
    great deal of tolerance and on the right track.

    It should also be stressed that Mossadegh, the deposed
    Prime Minister in operation AJAX was sent into exile.  He was not hung or shot, as is common
    practice with the current regime. Mossadegh was a nationalist – not a religious
    zealot.

    The fact is the major shortcomings of the Shah’s regime
    were corruption and the secret police – Savak. 
    That is why people rose up against the Shah.  They certainly did not bargain for a theocracy
    and war mongering.

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