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Patriot Act Two
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More wiretaps and secret searches, government access to credit reports and other personal records, a database of DNA samples, and provisions allowing the Attorney General to revoke the U.S. citizenship of anyone who provides assistance to a group the U.S. government considers a “terrorist” organization are just some of the proposals readying for Congressional consideration as part of a new, second Patriot Act.

The first USA Patriot Act sailed through Congress after the 9/11 terrorist attacks without much opposition. It might not be as easy this time around. Opposition is fierce and has forged alliances within a diverse group of advocacy groups, among them the ACLU and Gun Owners of America.

Click the “Listen” link above to hear if basic human rights protections in the United States are slipping away and whether the threat of terrorism leaves no other alternatives.

Guests:

Gail Chaddock, covers Congress for the Christian Science Monitor

Tim Lynch, Director of the Cato Institute’s Project on Criminal Justice and author of “Breaking the Vicious Cycle: Preserving Our Liberties While Fighting Terrorism”

Orin Kerr, Professor of Law at George Washington University

Steven Brill, contributing editor of Newsweek magazine and author of new book “After: How America Confronted the Sept. 12 Era”

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ONPOINT
TODAY
Apr 16, 2014
A woman walks past a CVS store window in Foxborough, Mass., Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2012. The nation’s major drugstore chains are opening more in-store clinics in response to the massive U.S. health care overhaul, which is expected to add about 25 million newly insured people who will need medical care and prescriptions, as well as offering more services as a way to boost revenue in the face of competition from stores like Safeway and Wal-Mart. (AP)

Retailers from Walgreens to Wal-Mart to CVS are looking to turn into health care outlets. It’s convenient. Is it good medicine? Plus: using tech to disrupt the healthcare market.

Apr 16, 2014
Harvard Business School is one of the top-ranked MBA programs in the country. Our guest today suggests those kinds of degrees aren't necessary for business success. (HBS / Facebook)

Humorist and longtime Fortune columnist Stanley Bing says, “forget the MBA.” He’s got the low-down on what you really need to master in business. Plus: the sky-high state of executive salaries.

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Apr 15, 2014
In this file photo, author and journalist Matt Taibbi speaks to a crowd of Occupy Wall Street protestors after a march on the offices of pharmaceutical giant Pfizer, Wednesday, Feb. 29, 2012, in New York. There was a heavy police presence around the 42nd Street area as the demonstration began Wednesday morning outside. (AP)

Muckraking journalist Matt Taibbi sees a huge and growing divide in the US justice system, where big money buys innocence and poverty means guilt. He joins us.

 
Apr 15, 2014
A crowd gathers at the finish line of the Boston Marathon in Boston for a Sports Illustrated photo shoot before the one-year anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombings, Saturday, April 12, 2014. (AP)

One year after the Boston Marathon bombing, we look at national and local security on the terrorism front now, and what we’ve learned.

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